Amazing over 50’s – Terry Tyler

I’m very excited to introduce another guest to my new series:

Amazing over 50’s

I’m inviting and featuring ‘Mid-lifers’ who are enjoying life over 50 and who are proud to shout out about great health, fitness, lifestyles, work, achievements etc, but more importantly who are embracing this time of their lives with pride.

I’m so pleased to introduce Terry Tyler this month as my third guest to this series.

Terry is an accomplished author of seventeen books available on Amazon, the latest being UK2, the third book in her post apocalyptic series, Project Renova. She is proud to be self-published, is an avid reader and book reviewer, and a member of Rosie Amber’s Book Review Team.

A Guest Post – The Amazing over 50’s

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Terry Tyler
 

I asked Terry to tell us a little about her working life and her blog

I was born in Cambridgeshire and moved via Northampton and Norfolk to Geordieland, where I have lived for the past 9 years. Nowadays I sit at home and write novels, but in the past I worked in Jobcentres, had my own gift shop for several years, ran a deli, was a nursing assistant in a psychiatric hospital, and did the usual bar/café jobs that most people leave off their CVs but provide some of my jolliest memories.  All of which have become material for books, of course.  Smiley face with a wink.

I have 2 blogs. I started my personal one in 2012 because someone told me that writers need them; it took me about 6 months to understand why.  Your blog is somewhere to write all the stuff that pops into your head that has no place in novels. Mine includes articles about writing and publishing, general ‘life’ stuff (random ideas that occur to me), TV/film reviews and recommendations. My other blog is for book reviews, which I started 3 years ago when I became a member of Rosie Amber’s Book Review Team. I read between 5 and 10 books every month and always review, because I know how important this is to writers

Do you remember how you felt before or when turning 50 and how you feel now in relation?

On the day itself: just fine, no different from any other day. Then a year or so later, when the menopause really kicked in, I became really downhearted and thought it was all over. But that didn’t last long; as my hormonal state changed, so did my head. Now, I’m happy in my own company, appreciate my family more, and just feel much more at peace, generally; I peer at my increasing amount of lines and white hairs with slightly appalled fascination, rather than terror!

Do you enjoy staying fit and healthy?

My immediate reaction to this question was ‘pass’, because in the last 2 years I have not been nearly as active as I should be, which means that my fitness levels have plummeted.  This is not just because writing novels necessitates sitting down most of the time, but because I have some knee problems that keep flaring up.  At the moment it’s as much as I can do to hobble around the supermarket once a week, but I am optimistic, and so fed up with not being able to stride out amongst trees and green that I am sure once I am better I will go for those 4 long walks a week that I always vow I will take – I will, I will!


On the plus side, I have almost stopped both smoking and drinking, both of which I was still doing far too much up until about 7 years ago.  As of May 19th I am pleased to report that I’ve only had 5 cigarettes this year, and no alcohol at all.  The alcohol bit is easy because I just went off it; I think it was my body telling me it’d like a drop of something weaker.
Last year I became a vegan; now, when I’m eating vegetables instead of red meat, blueberries and grapes instead of ice cream, and drinking green tea instead of wine, I hope I’m stopping myself from falling down dead.

I definitely feel the benefit; my skin is better, my hair grows faster (although this does mean I have to get the roots done more often), I rarely get that sluggish feeling, and my (ahem!) digestive system, something I’ve always had problems with, now works as it should.  A recent health check at the doctor told me that my blood sugar, cholesterol and blood pressure have all improved, which is not to be sniffed at.

Wow that’s brilliant and just goes to prove that healthy eating really can improve your general all round wellbeing.  I hope your knee problems are better soon Terry.  Are there things you’ve achieved after turning 50 that you’re proud of?

To be honest I don’t walk about thinking, ‘wow, I’ve achieved such-and-such’, I just get on with stuff because it’s what I want to do.  I haven’t wasted the past decade, though.  I’ve published all my books since I was 50 (I am now 58), developed a good readership, and made lots of new friends via the online writing/blogging community.  I started writing novels 25 years ago but never did much with it; I started again after a 10 year gap, in 2010, and then my sister told me about Amazon Kindle. I’ve never wanted to be other than self-published; this way I can write what I want, when I want.  Also, during this period I got married for the third time, which is like finding a peaceful haven after a long, eventful journey. Though I’m not sure that’s an achievement, probably just good luck!

Birhday blur

Publishing 17 books since turning 50 is a great achievement Terry!  Anything else you’d like to add with regards to life after 50, or any messages for people?

  • The menopause doesn’t last forever, and when it’s over you’ll feel okay again. Honest!
  • It’s time to do what you want to do, not what society/the neighbours/your family expects. You want to ‘downsize’, and/or sell up and travel Europe in a VW camper van? Do it. Cut out the relationship that you’ve only stayed in so you won’t feel lonely, the friend who doesn’t appreciate you. If you hate your job, ask yourself if it’s worth it. This is your life. You’ve already lived more than half of it, maybe even two thirds—we have to try not to keep repeating the same mistakes.
  • Alas, age is not just a number, physically, because your body does start to deteriorate, but taking care of your health can make a huge difference. Even if you think, ‘but I’ve stopped drinking and smoking, I walk alot and eat all this fruit and I still don’t feel like I did when I was 30’—no, you won’t. What you’ll feel like is a healthy 50-something, rather than an unhealthy one. And that is worth a great deal.

Thank you, Sam, for inviting me to your blog, and I hope your readers have enjoyed my offering!

Thank you Terry for being my third guest in my series – Amazing over 50’s

It’s been a pleasure hearing all about you and your journey and that’s great advice for an up and coming 50 something 🙂   Good luck with your latest book UK2

If you’d like to find out more about Terry then check out her links below

Terry’s blog

Terry’s Twitter page

Terry’s Amazon Page

If you’re loving your ‘Mid Life’ and would like to be a guest in my ‘Amazing over 50’s’ series please contact me Here and help me ‘Shout Out for the over 50’s’ 🙂

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